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Gopalasamy Reuben Clements est Professeur invité LabEx BCDiv au Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle du 1er septembre au 31 octobre 2016.

Les domaines scientifiques du professeur invité sont la conservation, le comportement, la biogéographie, l’écologie et et la systématique des mammifères et des mollusques en Malaisie Péninsulaire. Les habitats concernés sont les forêts humides, les eaux douces, les karsts et les peat swamps.

Contacts et porteurs du projet de PR invité LabEx BCDiv  : Pierre-Michel Forget (MECADEV), Géraldine Véron (ISYEB) & Colin Fontaine (CESCO)

Gopalasamy Reuben Clements is a conservation scientist by training, born in Singapore but living in Malaysia. He received his PhD from James Cook University and obtained his MSc and BSc from the National University of Singapore. Reuben is currently an Associate Professor at Universiti Malaysia Terengganu and the Principal Investigator of a tiger conservation project funded by two US-based organizations, Panthera and Woodland Park Zoo. His also holds two adjunct positions, an honorary Assistant Professor with the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, and a Research Fellow at Monash University Malaysia Campus.

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Reuben has accumulated over 10 years of field experience in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems in the Malay Archipelago. He has written over 60 articles in journals, magazines books, some of which has been featured the BBC, New York Times, National Geographic and Nature. Reuben co-founded a non-profit research group known as Rimba (rimbaresearch.org), which conducts research that contributes to the conservation of Malaysian biodiversity and to lobby government agencies for their better protection. Reuben has research experience in animal behaviour, biogeography, ecology and taxonomy of mammals and mollluscs. He is currently involved in the following activities: tiger and other large carnivore monitoring, wildlife law enforcement and policy improvement, land use and limestone karst conservation planning (using GIS and remote sensing), human-wildlife conflict mitigation, community conservation outreach through religious approaches, protected area establishment and management, road impact mitigation, sustainable forest management and wildlife corridor design and management. (Photo : Snail endemic to limestone karst, Peninsular Malaysia. (c) Reuben Clements.)

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Camera trap photo of the Malayan Tiger in Kenyir. Peninsular Malaysia (c) Rimba

Reuben’s website